Treatment

Treatment for peripheral, or other neuropathies can vary; depending upon the type of neuropathy (long or short nerves involved), the kind of neuropathy (autonomic, diabetic, proximal, focal, sensorimotor, etc.), if the patient has an implanted device (pacemaker, defibrillator, insulin pump, or etc.) and/or if the patient can personally handle any particular type of modality (artificial knees, not allowing whole body vibration, or the patient simply does not like a particular ‘feeling.’) This last is, probably, the most important as it directly affects patient compliance; as if someone doesn’t like something, they, probably, won’t continue with it!

After examination and testing is all finished, it’s time to start with whatever treatment which is best associated with the type of neuropathy the patient has. If they suffer from long nerve damage, we will, probably, treat with 7.83 Hz as a neuromuscular stimulation frequency. Treatment begins with placing electrodes in the particular part of the foot which is most affected; for example, if the ball of the foot hurts the most (has the most serious symptoms) an electrode of particular size is placed on it. An electrode is place bilaterally on the other foot; this way, the 7.83 Hz can ‘travel’ through the foot, up the leg, across the hips and lower back and down the other leg before reversing polarity and going back the other way. This both stimulates the foot itself (offering some pain relief, via, and underlined TENS signal.  PLEASE NOTE: NMES is not TENS therapy; but might have an underlined signal included as well!)

If other symptoms are present, such as edema in the foot and ankle, or ‘spotty’ numbness in the legs, another electrode may be placed in other areas of the leg or even opposite leg; again, should other issues be present, like polyneuropathy. In the case of drop foot, for example, multiple electrodes may be placed on the calf muscles as well as the ankles and foot. (Again, this is why a good Intake, Exam and Testing is so important!)

There is yet another way to treat with this frequency and sine wave; that is, to treat ‘wet.’ We will take tanks filled with warm electrolyte and water, appropriate for the size hands or feet, and place carbon/rubber electrodes in them. The DC current is then applied; which is amplified by the water. This helps to Vasodilate the tissue as well; meaning, bringing more blood/oxygen to the tissues, while electronic pulsations cause the muscles to contract and relax. At the same time, the small vascular valve in the back of the calf is forced open so that ‘pooled’ blood in the feet and lower legs can be sent back up to the heart, where is it ‘re-oxygenated,’ and sent back down to the feet again; thus, ‘feeding’ the myelin sheathing of each individual nerve. The synoptic junctions of the long nerves are, also, ‘fed,’ so to speak, by bringing more blood/oxygen to them… causing them to grow back closer together and naturally reduce symptoms.

With short nerves, we generally use a different frequency, 44 Hz, to help stimulate the Schwann cells to generate new myelin growth. This is an AC treatment, so it is never used ‘wet!’ If other symptoms are present, such as edema, muscle atrophy or again, drop foot, we may use multiple electrodes to treat each individual muscle group. Circulation is greatly improved and excess edema (fluid) is moved out.

One advantage electronic treatment has over, say massage, which too, can increase circulation, is that it also stimulates the brain to release endorphin’s; natural opiates/pain killers; which is ‘why’ people tend to feel better during or after treatment. In fact, patients often tell us during treatment, “I don’t know what you are doing to my feet… but my tennis elbow feels great!”  There is nothing in Endorphin’s which says, “Only go to the feet!” They go all over the body… so, it is only natural that ones ‘sore elbow’ or other issue would ‘feel better’ as well!

What else can be done?  Many things –  to much, in fact to go into detail in this single Blog; such as far wave (FIR) infrared light, acupuncture, acupressure, Acukoryo hand therapy, pressure point therapy, trigger point therapy, certified massage, lymphatic massage, localized vibration, whole body vibration, CES therapy, hypnotherapy, sensorimotor stimulation, nutrition, diet, vitamins, minerals and more! Each of these issues will be taken up on these pages, on a more individualized basis. Prescription drugs, however, is the one modality we don’t recommend. In fact, we attempt to work with the patient to get them off the prescription drugs… as many can actually cause the very neuropathy it is seeking to treat!

Many times, several of these modalities are combined for treatment; such as, the neuromuscular stimulation and far wave (FIR) infrared light. Both, will add comfort, while treating the muscles and nerves; however, the light helps the tissue create nitric oxide as well; which will help with oxygen and circulation.

When other issues, such as depression, PTSD, anxiety, stress, insomnia or added pain are an issue, we might add CES therapy as well; as it is FDA approved to treat such disorder. And frankly, I don’t know anyone who wouldn’t have at least some of these other disorders when having peripheral or some other neuropathy. With neuropathy of any sort, there is nothing to be happy about!

 

Next Blog: Cranial Electro Therapy Stimulation for Pain Control and Other Issues

 

 

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One response to “Treatment

  1. Pingback: Patient Compliance | Ask the Neuropathist

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