Health & Wellness Coaching

Motor nerve, or Proximal diabetic neuropathy, can also be known as lumbosacral radioplexus neurophagy, femoral neurophagy or diabetic amyotrophy.  It is a nerve disorder that,generally, results as a complication of diabetes mellitus.  It can affect the upper and lower thighs, hips, buttocks, legs, feet and toes.  Proximal diabetic neurophagy, is a peripheral nerve disease (diabetic neuropathy) characterized by painful muscle wasting (atrophy) and weakness. Although, it is found in both type I and type II diabetes, it is more often found with type II.

Simply put, from the graphic image, sensorimotor neuropathy, or polyneuropathy, as it is sometimes called, is a condition that causes a decreased ability to move or feel (sensation) because of nerve damage. The symptoms can be the inability to distinguish between heat and cold, a reverse reaction to sensori-stimulation (hot feels like cold, cold feels like hot, etc), numbness, or even hypersensitivity – meaning, the feet or hands/skin cannot stand touch without jumping or causing other discomfort. A good example of this, is the feeling that one is going to “jump out of their skin” at the mere touch of sheets, blankets, shoes or human touch.

In addition, it can mean the lack of feeling of things which can be of danger; such as: touching a hot stove, walking barefoot on something too hot, or even just stepping on a piece of glass or a nail. No “signals” are sent from the foot or hand to the brain, telling it to “Lift Up” quickly to avoid damage; thus, hands or feet can suffer second and third degree burns without the person knowing it.  Or, as I have had happen within my office, patients have come in with nails going through the bottom of their shoes, then going all the way through their foot until coming out the top; only for the nail to lodge in the tongue of the shoe. The patient never new they had stepped on a large nail!

Autonomic Neuropathy is as this post says: a group of symptoms that occur when there is damage to the nerves that manage every day body functions.

Standing alone, or part of other maladies, autonomic neuropathy symptoms can hit at any time. Sometimes, they may arise after eating particular foods, hit during the night or be a constant disorder.  Some of the more common symptoms autonomic neuropathy has, include:

  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Feeling full after only a few bites
  • Nausea after eating
  • Problems controlling bowel movements
  • Swallowing problems
  • Swollen Abdomen
  • Unable to distinguish between being hungry or full
  • Vomiting only bile
  • Vomiting of undigested food

Often, when presenting to a Neuropathist, autonomic neuropathy comes with an erroneous diagnosis of IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) or Celiac disease. This is found, mostly, with patients who have experienced untreated Peripheral Neuropathy for an extended period of time. Neuropathy symptoms, generally, start with the toes or bottom of the foot, then effect the foot as a whole, then starts moving up the leg with time. When a patient comes into the neuropathists office with symptoms lasting more than ten years, often we find that the IBS is really autonomic neuropathy; neuropathy, which is, now, affecting the internal organs and the autonomic system.

With neuropathies, it has been found, issues such as IBS or Celiac can be of an “malabsorption” issue; often, brought on by a gluten intolerance, or more often, Black Mold. 

Reverse the cause, modify the diet, and treating with neuromuscular stimulation, often reduces or eliminates the IBS symptoms.

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